Hivelocity servers come with a 2-port NIC by default, eth0 and eth1, each connected to independent interfaces on a switch. The switch ports serving each of your server's NICs may be independently configured with IPs and Subnets and attached to VLANs. Depending on the server's top of rack, ports may also be bonded .

601601

Each NIC is connected to a switch port on unique switches for redundancy.

Getting Ports

Ports are retrieved by requesting them for a specific device. The port will return information about the current ports:

Via API

Make a GET request to the /device/DEVICE_ID/ports

curl -X 'GET' \
  'https://core.hivelocity.net/api/v2/device/{DEVICE_ID}/ports' \
  -H 'accept: application/json' \
  -H 'X-API-KEY: $API_KEY'

Routing IPs to Ports

IP Subnets can be routed to a dedicated server's individual ports. To route a subnet to an individual port, first make sure that the subnet is not routed to any other entity. You can only route IPs to the public ports. In unbonded scenarios, the first port of your device (eth0) will always be the public port.

Via API

You can route an IP Subnet to a port, power a port on/off, and update the native vlan of a port with a PUT request to the /devices/{deviceId}/ports. You may pass in port objects for each port on the target device. This endpoint changes the ports to match the exact state of values given. For example, if you have ipAssignments on the port and you want to update the Native VLAN and you do not pass in the ipAssignment value, the existing IP Assignment will be removed.

curl --request PUT \
     --url https://core.hivelocity.net/api/v2/device/{deviceId}/ports \
     --header 'Accept: application/json' \
     --header 'Content-Type: application/json' \
     --data '
{
     "ports": [
          {
               "ipAssignments": [
                    "789"
               ],
               "portId": 456,
               "enabled": true,
              "nativeVlanId": 998
          }
     ]
}

Using the IPs

In order for your server to accept traffic over the assigned IP address, you must first configure your operating system to use a static IP.

All the examples below assume you are assigning the subnet 68.233.234.1/30. Replace this IP and its gateway with your IP address and Gateway.

AlmaLinux

The first thing we want to do is find the interface that we want to modify. To list all the interfaces on our system, we can use the ip a command:

$ ip a
...
2: ens160: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc fq_codel state UP group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 00:0c:29:14:b7:83 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 192.168.137.132/24 brd 192.168.137.255 scope global dynamic ens160
       valid_lft 1299sec preferred_lft 1299sec
    inet6 fe80::20c:29ff:fe14:b783/64 scope link noprefixroute 
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever

On this machine, the interface we are interested in working with is ens160.

To make your interface accept a designated subnet use the nmcli tool to change network settings for the target interface.

nmcli connection modify ens160 IPv4.address 68.233.234.1/30
nmcli connection modify ens160 IPv4.gateway 68.233.234.1

Ubuntu

The first step toward setting up a static IP address is identifying the name of the ethernet interface you want to configure. The ip link command prints a list of all the available network interfaces. In this example, the name of the interface is ens3. To do so, enter the command below:

ip link
...
1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1000
    link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
2: ens3: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc fq_codel state UP mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 08:00:27:6c:13:63 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff

To assign a static IP address on the network interface, open the Netplan configuration file:

sudo nano /etc/netplan/01-netcfg.yaml
network:
  version: 2
  renderer: networkd
  ethernets:
    ens3:
      dhcp4: yes

Your netplan filename may be slightly different, but it will always be in the /etc/netplan directory.

To assign a static IP address to ens3 interface, edit the file as follows:

  • Set DHCP to dhcp4: no.
  • Specify the static IP address. Under addresses: you can add one or more IPv4 or IPv6 IP addresses that will be assigned to the network interface.
  • Specify the gateway.
network:
  version: 2
  renderer: networkd
  ethernets:
    ens3:
      dhcp4: no
      addresses:
        - 68.233.234.1/30
      gateway4: 68.233.234.1

Once done, save the file and apply the changes by running the following command:

sudo netplan apply

Verify the changes by typing:

ip addr show dev ens3
...
 ens3: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 08:00:27:6c:13:63 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 192.168.121.221/24 brd 192.168.121.255 scope global dynamic ens3
       valid_lft 3575sec preferred_lft 3575sec
    inet6 fe80::5054:ff:feb0:f500/64 scope link 
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever

That’s it! You have assigned a static IP to your Ubuntu server. If you'd like to do something more complicated, netplan is well documented in the ubuntu docs.

Windows

Enter the PowerShell and find your network interfaces with the command:

Get-NetIPInterface -AddressFamily IPv4
...

ifIndex InterfaceAlias                  AddressFamily NlMtu(Bytes) InterfaceMetric Dhcp     ConnectionState PolicyStore
------- --------------                  ------------- ------------ --------------- ----     --------------- -----------
6       Ethernet                        IPv4                  1500              15 Enabled  Connected       ActiveStore
1       Loopback Pseudo-Interface 1     IPv4            4294967295              75 Disabled Connected       ActiveStore

In order to use a static IP, you must disable DHCP by running:

Set-NetIPInterface -InterfaceIndex 6 -Dhcp Disabled

Now you can assign your subnet to the target interface. Pay attention to the prefix length and make sure it matches your subnet mask. In our example this would be the 30 from /30

New-NetIPAddress -InterfaceIndex 6 -AddressFamily IPv4 -IPAddress "68.233.234.1" -PrefixLength 30 -DefaultGateway "68.233.234.1'

Confirm your new settings with:

ipconfig /all 
...
Windows IP Configuration

   Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : my.hivelocity.server
   Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . : hv.server
   Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
   IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
   WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
   DNS Suffix Search List. . . . . . : hv.server

Ethernet adapter Ethernet:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Red Hat VirtIO Ethernet Adapter
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 52-54-00-07-22-41
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::b547:c48c:6151:2fcf%6(Preferred)
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 68.233.234.1(Preferred)
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.252
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 68.233.234.1
   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 8.8.8.8
   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Remove IPs from Ports

Once a subnet is removed from a port, the IPs will no longer reach the device. In some cases, this can cause your device to become inaccessible. If you lose access to your device, you can use the IPMI Console to reconnect to your device.

Via API

Make a PUT request to /devices/{deviceId}/ports with a an empty list for ipAssignment to remove the subnet and/or with a null value for nativeVlanId to remove the native VLAN.

curl --request PUT \
     --url https://core.hivelocity.net/api/v2/device/{deviceId}/ports \
     --header 'Accept: application/json' \
     --header 'Content-Type: application/json' \
     --data '
{
     "ports": [
          {
               "ipAssignments": [],
               "portId": 456,
               "enabled": true,
               "nativeVlanId": null
          }
     ]
}

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